Omeprazole Alternatives

Written byHussain Abdeh MPharm: 2211840

Published on: 21/05/2021

Updated on: 28/05/2021

 

While problems like acid reflux and heartburn are very common, suffering with the symptoms they cause can be very uncomfortable and unpleasant. Thankfully, there are various medicines available to successfully combat the symptoms of issues like gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), heartburn and indigestion.

One of the most widely prescribed medicines for these problems is omeprazole 20mg capsules. However, there are many other medications available which can also successfully treat these issues. Finding the most suitable medicine for you to take can be difficult when there are multiple options.

This article will be taking a look at a few of the main alternatives to omeprazole. We will explore the similarities and differences between these medications and omeprazole capsules, as well as who should and should not take them as an alternative.

What is omeprazole?

Omeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medicine. It works by stopping the proton pumps in your stomach lining from working properly. Proton pumps are tiny substances that help the stomach to produce acid so food can be properly digested.

Decreasing how much acid is produced by the stomach means that omeprazole can be highly effective in relieving problems made worse by excessive stomach acid, such as GORD, stomach ulcers and heartburn.

Omeprazole is most commonly taken as a prescription-only medicine (POM). However, low-dose capsules and tablets of the medication (up to 20mg) can be bought from pharmacies without needing a prescription; these doses are used to treat the symptoms of heartburn and acid reflux.

Both adults and children can take this medication, but children should only take it when they have been prescribed it by a doctor. A liquid version of omeprazole is also available for children and people who have difficulties swallowing tablets or capsules. To make sure you take the correct dose, this liquid medicine will normally come with a syringe or spoon.

Omeprazole is considered to be safe and has been clinically proven to be highly effective in reducing stomach acid production.

For more information about Omeprazole, read our helpful medical guide on "what is Omeprazole"

Lansoprazole vs omeprazole

One of omeprazole’s biggest rivals is another proton pump inhibitor medicine, lansoprazole. Lansoprazole works in the same way as omeprazole, by reducing how much acid your stomach makes.

Unlike omeprazole, lansoprazole cannot be bought from pharmacies without a prescription. You must have been prescribed this medication to take it. It is mostly prescribed for indigestion, heartburn, acid reflux and GORD. It can also be used to both treat and prevent stomach ulcers.

Omeprazole tablets can be bought in doses of 10mg, 20mg or 40mg. To learn more about what Omeprazole dose may be best suitable for you, read our detailed medical guide.

Lansoprazole is available in doses of 15mg or 30mg. 

Like omeprazole, lansoprazole gastro-resistant capsules are also available as tablets and capsules. Additionally, it can be bought as orodispersible tablets, which dissolve in the mouth when placed on the tongue. The medicine then disperses in the mouth and is swallowed with your saliva. The orodispersible version of lansoprazole is ideal for people who have trouble swallowing tablets whole, or who may suffer with bad indigestion or wind.

Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding will normally be prescribed omeprazole as an alternative to lansoprazole, which is not generally considered safe for women in these situations.

A study found that both Lansoprazole and Omeprazole have very few minor differences when both medicines are prescribed in their standard doses to treat stomach acid related conditions. 

Our guide to lansoprazole explains everthing you need to know before using Lansoprazole as a treatment option.

What is the difference between Omeprazole and Lansoprazole?

There are no major differences between Lansoprazole and Omeprazole. We have summarised both medicines below.

  Lansoprazole Omeprazole
Drug Type

Proton Pump Inhibitor (PPI)

Proton Pump Inhibitor (PPI)

Available Doses

15mg,30mg

10mg,20mg,40mg

Treats

Acid Reflux (GERD)

H. pylori Infections

Benign Gastric Ulceration

Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

Dyspepsia (Indigestion)

Acid Reflux (GERD)

H. pylori Infections

Benign Gastric Ulceration

Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

Dyspepsia (Indigestion)

Active Ingredient

Lansoprazole Omeprazole

Administration

Oral (tablet/capsule)

Oral (tablet/capsule)

 

Price

£11.99 - £30.99

£11.99 - £29.99

Ranitidine vs omeprazole

Ranitidine has been discontinued, with omeprazole now being the main recommended alternative to this medication. Unlike omeprazole and lansoprazole, ranitidine is not a proton pump inhibitor; it belongs to a group of medicines called histamine receptor agonists (also referred to as H2 blockers).

Ranitidine also works to reduce how much stomach acid is produced, but in a different way to omeprazole. Omeprazole works by preventing proton pumps from working effectively, which reduces how much stomach acid is produced.

In contrast, ranitidine works by blocking a naturally occurring chemical in your body called histamine. Histamine encourages your body to produce the acid it needs to digest food. Taking a H2 blocker like this one means that there is less acid in your stomach, so that ulcers and inflammatory problems can heal properly.

Generally, omeprazole is considered to be more effective than ranitidine. This is because proton pump inhibitors work to block the proton pumps, which play a role in the final part of acid secretion. In contrast, H2 receptor agonists only block one pathway of acid production.

Pantoprazole vs omeprazole

Like omeprazole, pantoprazole is also a proton pump inhibitor. It works in the same way as omeprazole and lansoprazole and can be bought over the counter in low doses.

Pantoprazole can be taken as a long-term medication. However, it carries the same risks as lansoprazole and omeprazole. If taken for longer than three months, your blood’s magnesium levels may fall; this can cause you to experience issues like tiredness, confusion, dizziness, shaking and an irregular heartbeat.

Furthermore, if any of these three medicines are taken for more than one year, the chances of experiencing the following side effects may be higher:

  • Infections of the gut
  • Fractured bones
  • Vitamin B12 deficiency

Taking any of these three medicines for longer than a year will mean that your doctor will have to monitor your health regularly. They will need to make sure it is safe for you to keep taking them, long-term.

Unlike omeprazole, pantoprazole is not normally considered safe to be taken by women who are pregnant. It is, however, safe for women who are breastfeeding.

While omeprazole can be taken by children and babies when prescribed, pantoprazole should not be taken by children under the age of 12 years.

Doses for pantoprazole are often lower than those for omeprazole. For instance, omeprazole’s usual dose for heartburn and acid reflux is between 20mg and 40mg each day. Pantoprazole’s recommended daily dose is 20mg.

Esomeprazole vs omeprazole

Esomeprazole is also a PPI that reduces stomach acid production. Just like the other proton pump inhibitors discussed here, if you are prescribed esomeprazole, you will most likely be told to take it once a day, first thing in the morning. Esomeprazole is available in 20mg and 40mg doses.

Some clinical research has suggested that esomeprazole may be more effective at treating conditions like GORD. However, omeprazole is more commonly prescribed because it is safer for a wider range of people. Furthermore, esomeprazole is often more expensive than omeprazole.

Esomeprazole can be taken by children, but only when a doctor has prescribed it for them. Like omeprazole, the dose of esomeprazole will normally be lower for children and people who are suffering with liver problems.

Esomeprazole is not normally recommended for pregnant or breastfeeding women. Instead, omeprazole will most likely be prescribed.

The potential risk of side effects due to long-term use of esomeprazole are also the same as those for omeprazole, pantoprazole, and lansoprazole.

The side effects of each of the PPI medicines discussed here are all very similar, also. The most common side effects associated with omeprazole, lansoprazole, esomeprazole, and pantoprazole are:

  • Headaches
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhoea
  • Stomach pain
  • Wind
  • Vomiting
  • Constipation

Summary

While there are various medications available for the treatment of GORD, heartburn, indigestion and acid reflux, omeprazole is the one that is most frequently prescribed. It can treat a wide range of problems and can be taken by an equally wide range of people, including children and women who are pregnant and breastfeeding.

Omeprazole shares much of the same characteristics as other commonly prescribed Proton Pump Inhibitors, for example, they are prescribed to treat many of the same conditions, their mechanism of action is very similar and the timeframe in which they take to start working is also very similar.

In addition to this, omeprazole side effects are also very similar when compared to its alternatives due to the similarities in each.

To find the most suitable medication for your condition, you should always talk to a registered doctor or pharmacist. You can do this with Medicine Direct by completing our confidential online consultation questionnaire. One of our doctors, pharmacists or prescribers will be able to prescribe the most appropriate medication for you once you have answered some simple questions about your health and condition.

References

Information on Proton Pump Inhibitors from Harvard Health - https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/proton-pump-inhibitors

https://www.nhs.uk/medicines/lansoprazole/

https://www.nhs.uk/medicines/omeprazole/

https://www.druggist.online/omeprazole-alternative/

https://www.nhs.uk/medicines/ranitidine/

https://www.nhs.uk/medicines/esomeprazole/

https://www.druggist.online/esomeprazole-vs-omeprazole/

How to take Omeprazole

Omeprazole Patient Information Leaflet

Omeprazole Alternatives

Written byHussain Abdeh MPharm: 2211840

Published on: 21/05/2021

Updated on: 28/05/2021

 

While problems like acid reflux and heartburn are very common, suffering with the symptoms they cause can be very uncomfortable and unpleasant. Thankfully, there are various medicines available to successfully combat the symptoms of issues like gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), heartburn and indigestion.

One of the most widely prescribed medicines for these problems is omeprazole 20mg capsules. However, there are many other medications available which can also successfully treat these issues. Finding the most suitable medicine for you to take can be difficult when there are multiple options.

This article will be taking a look at a few of the main alternatives to omeprazole. We will explore the similarities and differences between these medications and omeprazole capsules, as well as who should and should not take them as an alternative.

What is omeprazole?

Omeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medicine. It works by stopping the proton pumps in your stomach lining from working properly. Proton pumps are tiny substances that help the stomach to produce acid so food can be properly digested.

Decreasing how much acid is produced by the stomach means that omeprazole can be highly effective in relieving problems made worse by excessive stomach acid, such as GORD, stomach ulcers and heartburn.

Omeprazole is most commonly taken as a prescription-only medicine (POM). However, low-dose capsules and tablets of the medication (up to 20mg) can be bought from pharmacies without needing a prescription; these doses are used to treat the symptoms of heartburn and acid reflux.

Both adults and children can take this medication, but children should only take it when they have been prescribed it by a doctor. A liquid version of omeprazole is also available for children and people who have difficulties swallowing tablets or capsules. To make sure you take the correct dose, this liquid medicine will normally come with a syringe or spoon.

Omeprazole is considered to be safe and has been clinically proven to be highly effective in reducing stomach acid production.

For more information about Omeprazole, read our helpful medical guide on "what is Omeprazole"

Lansoprazole vs omeprazole

One of omeprazole’s biggest rivals is another proton pump inhibitor medicine, lansoprazole. Lansoprazole works in the same way as omeprazole, by reducing how much acid your stomach makes.

Unlike omeprazole, lansoprazole cannot be bought from pharmacies without a prescription. You must have been prescribed this medication to take it. It is mostly prescribed for indigestion, heartburn, acid reflux and GORD. It can also be used to both treat and prevent stomach ulcers.

Omeprazole tablets can be bought in doses of 10mg, 20mg or 40mg. To learn more about what Omeprazole dose may be best suitable for you, read our detailed medical guide.

Lansoprazole is available in doses of 15mg or 30mg. 

Like omeprazole, lansoprazole gastro-resistant capsules are also available as tablets and capsules. Additionally, it can be bought as orodispersible tablets, which dissolve in the mouth when placed on the tongue. The medicine then disperses in the mouth and is swallowed with your saliva. The orodispersible version of lansoprazole is ideal for people who have trouble swallowing tablets whole, or who may suffer with bad indigestion or wind.

Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding will normally be prescribed omeprazole as an alternative to lansoprazole, which is not generally considered safe for women in these situations.

A study found that both Lansoprazole and Omeprazole have very few minor differences when both medicines are prescribed in their standard doses to treat stomach acid related conditions. 

Our guide to lansoprazole explains everthing you need to know before using Lansoprazole as a treatment option.

What is the difference between Omeprazole and Lansoprazole?

There are no major differences between Lansoprazole and Omeprazole. We have summarised both medicines below.

  Lansoprazole Omeprazole
Drug Type

Proton Pump Inhibitor (PPI)

Proton Pump Inhibitor (PPI)

Available Doses

15mg,30mg

10mg,20mg,40mg

Treats

Acid Reflux (GERD)

H. pylori Infections

Benign Gastric Ulceration

Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

Dyspepsia (Indigestion)

Acid Reflux (GERD)

H. pylori Infections

Benign Gastric Ulceration

Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

Dyspepsia (Indigestion)

Active Ingredient

Lansoprazole Omeprazole

Administration

Oral (tablet/capsule)

Oral (tablet/capsule)

 

Price

£11.99 - £30.99

£11.99 - £29.99

Ranitidine vs omeprazole

Ranitidine has been discontinued, with omeprazole now being the main recommended alternative to this medication. Unlike omeprazole and lansoprazole, ranitidine is not a proton pump inhibitor; it belongs to a group of medicines called histamine receptor agonists (also referred to as H2 blockers).

Ranitidine also works to reduce how much stomach acid is produced, but in a different way to omeprazole. Omeprazole works by preventing proton pumps from working effectively, which reduces how much stomach acid is produced.

In contrast, ranitidine works by blocking a naturally occurring chemical in your body called histamine. Histamine encourages your body to produce the acid it needs to digest food. Taking a H2 blocker like this one means that there is less acid in your stomach, so that ulcers and inflammatory problems can heal properly.

Generally, omeprazole is considered to be more effective than ranitidine. This is because proton pump inhibitors work to block the proton pumps, which play a role in the final part of acid secretion. In contrast, H2 receptor agonists only block one pathway of acid production.

Pantoprazole vs omeprazole

Like omeprazole, pantoprazole is also a proton pump inhibitor. It works in the same way as omeprazole and lansoprazole and can be bought over the counter in low doses.

Pantoprazole can be taken as a long-term medication. However, it carries the same risks as lansoprazole and omeprazole. If taken for longer than three months, your blood’s magnesium levels may fall; this can cause you to experience issues like tiredness, confusion, dizziness, shaking and an irregular heartbeat.

Furthermore, if any of these three medicines are taken for more than one year, the chances of experiencing the following side effects may be higher:

  • Infections of the gut
  • Fractured bones
  • Vitamin B12 deficiency

Taking any of these three medicines for longer than a year will mean that your doctor will have to monitor your health regularly. They will need to make sure it is safe for you to keep taking them, long-term.

Unlike omeprazole, pantoprazole is not normally considered safe to be taken by women who are pregnant. It is, however, safe for women who are breastfeeding.

While omeprazole can be taken by children and babies when prescribed, pantoprazole should not be taken by children under the age of 12 years.

Doses for pantoprazole are often lower than those for omeprazole. For instance, omeprazole’s usual dose for heartburn and acid reflux is between 20mg and 40mg each day. Pantoprazole’s recommended daily dose is 20mg.

Esomeprazole vs omeprazole

Esomeprazole is also a PPI that reduces stomach acid production. Just like the other proton pump inhibitors discussed here, if you are prescribed esomeprazole, you will most likely be told to take it once a day, first thing in the morning. Esomeprazole is available in 20mg and 40mg doses.

Some clinical research has suggested that esomeprazole may be more effective at treating conditions like GORD. However, omeprazole is more commonly prescribed because it is safer for a wider range of people. Furthermore, esomeprazole is often more expensive than omeprazole.

Esomeprazole can be taken by children, but only when a doctor has prescribed it for them. Like omeprazole, the dose of esomeprazole will normally be lower for children and people who are suffering with liver problems.

Esomeprazole is not normally recommended for pregnant or breastfeeding women. Instead, omeprazole will most likely be prescribed.

The potential risk of side effects due to long-term use of esomeprazole are also the same as those for omeprazole, pantoprazole, and lansoprazole.

The side effects of each of the PPI medicines discussed here are all very similar, also. The most common side effects associated with omeprazole, lansoprazole, esomeprazole, and pantoprazole are:

  • Headaches
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhoea
  • Stomach pain
  • Wind
  • Vomiting
  • Constipation

Summary

While there are various medications available for the treatment of GORD, heartburn, indigestion and acid reflux, omeprazole is the one that is most frequently prescribed. It can treat a wide range of problems and can be taken by an equally wide range of people, including children and women who are pregnant and breastfeeding.

Omeprazole shares much of the same characteristics as other commonly prescribed Proton Pump Inhibitors, for example, they are prescribed to treat many of the same conditions, their mechanism of action is very similar and the timeframe in which they take to start working is also very similar.

In addition to this, omeprazole side effects are also very similar when compared to its alternatives due to the similarities in each.

To find the most suitable medication for your condition, you should always talk to a registered doctor or pharmacist. You can do this with Medicine Direct by completing our confidential online consultation questionnaire. One of our doctors, pharmacists or prescribers will be able to prescribe the most appropriate medication for you once you have answered some simple questions about your health and condition.

References

Information on Proton Pump Inhibitors from Harvard Health - https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/proton-pump-inhibitors

https://www.nhs.uk/medicines/lansoprazole/

https://www.nhs.uk/medicines/omeprazole/

https://www.druggist.online/omeprazole-alternative/

https://www.nhs.uk/medicines/ranitidine/

https://www.nhs.uk/medicines/esomeprazole/

https://www.druggist.online/esomeprazole-vs-omeprazole/

How to take Omeprazole

Omeprazole Patient Information Leaflet

What is there difference between Omeprazole and Lansoprazole as well as other available alternatives?
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